Star Wars Battlefront Review | Stay On Target

Star Wars Battlefront Review | Stay on Target

Star Wars Battlefront provides one of the best experiences in a video game. Unfortunately, the gameplay fails to heighten that experience.

Entertainment

This is Star Wars; it looks, sounds, and feels like the movies. At times, the intensity in gameplay is there to match it, too. Whether your TIE Fighter is chasing down a Rebel Snowspeeder attempting to trip-up an AT-AT walker on Hoth, or you’re using the jungle of Endor’s Moon to eliminate the Empire’s attacking infantry, you can’t help but feel like you’re a part of the action. Developer DICE has absolutely nailed this game’s presentation. It’s a love letter to fans of the movie franchise, putting smiles on their faces and transporting them back to their childhood memories.

It’s just a shame that the actual game part of this video game can’t keep up.

Replayability

Much has been said concerning Battlefront’s lack of depth, and there’s no denying it. As much fun as the game can be, there’s not exactly much to it. Its premise can easily wear thin, especially after extended play-sessions. This is a title that’s best in short spurts and those with some time you’re waiting for your laundry to finish or you need a change of pace from, say, Fallout 4. Those that were hoping for the complexities and depth of a Battlefield 4 within the Star Wars universe will come away disappointed. That’s not to say the gameplay suffers, though. While simplistic in nature, the accessible approach works out, growing on the player over time. It won’t rival the bigger shooters on the market, such as a Halo or Call of Duty, but it’s definitely not a bad experience.

Star Wars Battlefront Review | Stay On Target

Gameplay

Instead, things feel a little more relaxed, emphasizing fun over strategy. This works in tandem with the game’s presentation, as if this game is more about Star Wars than Battlefront. Given the lack of depth, that doesn’t come off as much of a shock. Yes, much has been said about what’s not present here (single player campaign, Galactic conquest, planet diversity), and it is a problem. The game’s main attraction are the three marquee modes at your disposal: Supremacy (large scale battles), Walker Assault (attack/defend AT-AT Walkers as they march onto their target), and Fighter Squadron (aerial combat). This is where you’ll spend about 90 percent playing Battlefront and there are two reasons for this. First, these modes are that enjoyable. Second, the other modes don’t offer much depth. With the exception of a surprisingly fun Heroes vs. Villains mode, everything else the game offers is simply outclassed by other shooters on the market. Therefore, we have to stick with what Battlefront does best: large scale Star Wars battles.

It is here that the spectacle takes over, at times hiding the game’s inadequacies. It’s hard to complain about a game’s shortcomings when you’re piloting the Millennium Falcon, shooting down TIE Fighters and dodging incoming fire from SLAVE 1. The question, though, is how far can these moments carry the game? Is it fair for the Star Wars experience to carry the Battlefront gameplay? No, but there’s no choice here. Take away everything Star Wars and you’re left with an average, simplistic shooter that feels more like a launch title than a major holiday season release.

That might be enough for some. Others, however, will be rightfully disappointed. Honestly, it’s entirely up to you to determine if the reward is worth the risk.

For more on Star Wars Battlefront, check out our coverage of the game:

Final Thoughts

Star Wars Battlefront may not be perfect, but it’s still better than trade negotiations.

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